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Welcome To Our House: Community

Welcome To Our House: Community

There’s a lot going on in the month of October. It is finally beginning to feel like fall, school is in full swing, and everything is pumpkin spiced. The start of October also kicks off National Bullying Prevention month which we would like to shine more light on. Each week, we’ll cover a new area of Bullying Prevention and how you and your family can share in helping us #StopTheBullying. Check out the first posts here.

 

“It takes a village to raise a child.” How many times have we heard this or seen it on a poster?

As parents, sure, we can all use a hand sometimes. Whether it’s carpooling when you just can’t get out of work on time or calling the babysitter when you have a million errands to run, we can all use a helping hand. As it turns out though, that assistance from a neighbor could be helping your child develop into a more successful adult.

Search Institute research shows that children who spend time around adults who model positive and responsible behavior grow up to exhibit those behaviors themselves. The more you do to prevent bullying in your community, the more your child and the children in your community will do the same.

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Here are some ways to get your community more involved in taking a stand against bullying:

  1. Start a kindness week. A project called Dude, Be Nice works with schools and communities to spread positivity. Try an at-home version of their “Dude, Be Nice week”.
    • Monday—Leave words of kindness and encouragement in different places. Write them on a sticky note and stick it on a paper towel dispenser or on a stranger’s windshield.
    • Tuesday—Invite a family in your neighborhood over for dinner to get to know them better.
    • Wednesday—Identify someone who may be underappreciated in your community and encourage others to write thank you notes to them. It could be a crossing guard, a teacher, a school bus driver, anyone!
    • Thursday—Attend a school organization, club, or sport that is not usually heavily attended and show your support. Cheer loudly, make posters, and bring your friends!
    • Friday—Recognize someone who is consistently nice and kind to others and let them know how much you admire them!
  2. Invite a special speaker to your next PTA meeting. Barbara Coloroso recently spoke at a town hall meeting in Alamo Heights and has a great talk on “the bullies, the bullied and the not-so-innocent bystander”.
  3. Create an anti-bullying board for your next neighborhood night out. Each person traces and signs their handprint to represent their commitment against bullying. Check out this one from Forsyth Elementary!
  4. As always, if you see something, say something. One of the best ways to spread change in your community is to speak up when you see something or if your child tells you about something happening to them or to a peer at school. A movement begins with one person!
Welcome To Our House: Support

Welcome To Our House: Support

There’s a lot going on in the month of October. It is finally beginning to feel like fall, school is in full swing, and everything is pumpkin spiced. The start of October also kicks off National Bullying Prevention month which we would like to shine more light on. Each week, we’ll cover a new area of Bullying Prevention and how you and your family can share in helping us #StopTheBullying.

 

When you buy a house, you always check the foundation; that’s just common sense. Then, you’ll check out the inner support system and framing. The foundation will keep the house level, but the framing will prevent the house from crashing in on itself, right?

Much like homes have a support system, so do we. We surround ourselves and our families with friends, relatives, and community members.  When it comes to bullying prevention, you can’t force anyone into action, but you can be a force of positive peer influence! Try a few of these things….

  1. Respect the thoughts, feelings, and opinions of others. A study from the Making Caring Common Project at Harvard University found that, instead of teaching “perspective-taking”, kids learn true empathy by learning how to understand, value, and respect the opinions of others, even if they don’t agree. Simple actions like waiting until the other person is finished talking before you start, actively listening to others, and discussing rather than arguing are all great ways to role model for your kids.
  2. Make the most of teachable moments. As a parent, you are surrounded with moments to teach your child. When you lose your cool (as we all do), teach the importance of an apology; no matter how small the matter may seem. When someone looks like they could use a hand, discuss being helpful and kind; even if the other person says ‘no, thank you’. Use everyday occurrences to role model for and teach your child important social skills.
  3. Say something when you see something. The best way to role model and prevent bullying? To be an upstander! If you see or hear, bullying, gossip or intentional exclusion, speak up. Show your children and those around you how to stand up for others and that bullying is not tolerated.
  4. Talk to your children about good behavior and being kind. Having a continuous conversation about kindness stresses the importance to kids. Ask your child to tell you one nice thing they did that day for another person. Talk about what to do when they don’t like or agree with someone and how to handle various situations. Brainstorm random acts of kindness to spread while you’re running errands together like paying for the coffee of the person behind you, leaving anonymous sticky notes with kind messages on them on a bathroom mirror, or placing coupons you aren’t going to use next to that product in the grocery store.
Welcome To Our House: Foundations

Welcome To Our House: Foundations

There’s a lot going on in the month of October. It is finally beginning to feel like fall, school is in full swing, and everything is pumpkin spiced. The start of October also kicks off National Bullying Prevention month which we would like to shine more light on. Each week, we’ll cover a new area of Bullying Prevention and how you and your family can share in helping us #StopTheBullying. Let’s jump in!

 

Think of the most beautiful house you’ve ever seen. Maybe the curb appeal is what stole your attention, maybe the floor plan is spectacular, or maybe it just feels like the home of your dreams. How well is your dream house going to stand with a cracked foundation though?

Bullying prevention falls the same way. We can say and do all of the right things, but if we are not fully committed to taking action, our programs and efforts are built on a shaky foundation. Here are some ways to begin to prevent bullying, starting with yourself.

  1. Pay attention to your inner dialogue. How much of what you say to yourself is something you would say to another person or your children? We can be our toughest critics, but being nice to ourselves makes being nice to others easier. When you start to bully yourself…ask these questions.
    • What emotions am I feeling right now?
    • Why is this troubling me?
    • What can I do right now to make this situation better?
  1. Take a deep breath. At times, you just need a break. Take the time to be aware of how your body feels when you’re stressed or happy or upset. When you begin to notice certain feelings or sensations, change your body position. Change your posture, take a quick stretch, or take 5 minutes to get some fresh air. Change your physical state to change your psychological state.
  1. Start each day on a positive note! There’s a reason we love watching videos of morning affirmations, they make us smile and feel good! Try listing 5 things you like about yourself in the morning. These don’t have to be tangible things, just 5 things you like about what makes you, you. Need an idea? This daddy/daughter duo has some great examples!

What We Can Learn From A Six-Year Old

What We Can Learn From A Six-Year Old

Six-year old Alex caught the attention of the nation when he wrote a letter to President Obama asking him to bring a young bombing victim to his suburban home. Alex assures the President that, “we’ll be waiting for you guys with flags, flowers, and balloons. We will give him a family and he will be our brother.” We all could learn a thing or two from Alex.

A recent survey by Harvard University’s Making Caring Common Project reports “a large majority of youth across a wide spectrum of races, cultures, and classes appear to value aspects of personal success—achievement and happiness—over concern for others”. The authors found about 80% of students ranked high achievement or happiness as what was most important to them; a stark contrast to the approximate 20% who chose caring for others. The MCCP discovered a rhetoric/reality gap may be the root of the problem. Meaning, as parents, we might say all of the right things by stressing the importance of being empathetic, but fail to follow through and actually demonstrate how the thoughts, feelings, and opinions of others are valued and respected, whether we agree with them or not.

Empathy is like a muscle, it functions best when stretched and exercised regularly. Camp gives kids the environment to do just that. Every two and four week camper draws for their crew on the first night of their first year and they become an Explorer, Mountaineer, or Tracker for life. Being on a crew gives campers the chance to work cohesively on a team for events like Crew Challenge, Field Day, and the Adventure Race. When it’s game time and competitive spirits are running high, it takes empathy to be able to realize how the other camper on his/her crew feels about missing the archery target or not making the soccer team for Field Day and to respond with kindness.

Many campers don’t have six to 11 brothers or sisters to share a room with either. Cabin life teaches campers to be respectful of others’ boundaries and to think outside of their own interests, whether it’s choosing a Cabin Night activity, giving someone else the chance to sit next to their counselor at lunch, or just listening to one another during daily Value Sessions. Flex your family’s empathy muscle by trying some of the follow Value Sessions at home!

WEB OF SUPPORT

MATERIALS: Yarn

Have your family sit in a circle; then give one person a ball of yarn. Ask that person to name one person who supports her or him and how. Then ask the camper to hold the end of the string and throw the rest of the ball to another person in the circle. The person who catches the ball of yarn should then name another person who supports her or him and how before holding an end of the yarn and throwing the ball to someone else. As the activity continues, a web that connects everyone will appear. Make sure that everyone gets to participate at least once.

Discussion Questions:

  • How many different types of people did we name (family, friends, neighbors)?
  • Is it more important to you to have lots of different people who are somewhat supportive or just a few who are very supportive? Why?
  • What attributes do supportive people have that are important to you?
  • If someone you know seemed to need more support, how would you suggest that he or she find it?

 

HAVE YOU FILLED A BUCKET TODAY?

MATERIALS: Have You Filled a Bucket Today? by Carol McCloud and David Messing

Show children the book and ask who has heard of it before. Ask: What might be bucket filling? What do you think the bucket stands for? Who might need to have their bucket filled? How might we fill buckets? Read the story Have You Filled a Bucket Today.

Discussion Questions:

  • Are you a bucket filler or a bucket dipper or both?
  • Why might someone be a bucket dipper?
  • How do you feel when your bucket is full? Empty?
  • Why is it important to “fill people’s buckets”? How does it make you feel?
  • How can we work together to fill each other’s buckets? What are specific things you can do?

 

FIVE FINGERS

MATERIALS: None

Have everyone sit in a circle. Explain that each finger will be something that you share with the group.

  • Thumb – Something you like about yourself (Thumbs up)
  • Index – Direction you are headed (can be literal or figurative, point when explaining this finger)
  • Middle – Something you don’t like about yourself
  • Ring – Something that you are committed to (Like a ring)
  • Pinky – A quirky fact

Discussion Questions:

  • How did it feel to share about yourself?
  • Did you learn something new about someone else? Was any of it surprising?
  • How did it feel to share what you don’t like about yourself? How can we help each other with things like this?

As we head into National Bullying Prevention Month, now is a great time to follow our friend Alex’s lead, spread a little understanding and flex those empathy muscles!

What’s Your Role in the Routine of Responsibility?

What’s Your Role in the Routine of Responsibility?

When school is out for the summer, teachers and administrators warn about summer learning loss and tactics to prevent it. However, have you considered what you can do to prevent camp learning loss?

At summer camp, kids fall into a routine of responsibility (asset #30). They are in charge of their daily chores, making their beds, preparing themselves for the day ahead, remembering their schedule, packing necessary items for their activities, and more. Without mom and dad, but with the guidance of counselors, campers practice caring for themselves and feel ownership over their daily lives.

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Catholic High School for Boys in Little Rock, AR encourages parents to hand over daily responsibilities to their sons.

Back at home, it can be easy for parents to ease back into the responsibility role for their campers. While this means 9 times out of 10 your camper will be prepared and have what he/she needs for the day, what lesson is it teaching? Here are some strategies to keep your camper in the routine of responsibility:

  • Remind yourself it’s ok for your camper to stumble. It may take a few “oops” moments to remember to pack a textbook or pair of shoes for practice, but it is part of learning. The sense of accomplishment he/she will feel when nothing is forgotten for a whole week is worth it!
  • Take a small step back. Reading over a major project or giving a few reminders about an important deadline is ok; you don’t have to leave your camper to fend for his or her self. Try asking questions about how a project is going or who they have been working with on it. This shows support and interest in their day without going into helicopter parent mode.
  • Create expectations. Talk to your camper about taking on more responsibility at home like taking out the trash, feeding the dog, or helping with dinner and dishes. He or she may come to you with questions about how you do things or tips for staying ahead of schedule.

The saying ‘practice makes perfect’ is used commonly around schools, but also rings true for assets and developmental skills learned at camp!

So Long, Sweet Summer!

So Long, Sweet Summer!

Summer is winding down and fall is quickly approaching. As we head into a new season and all of the activity it brings, here are some handy resources and tips for jumping into a fantastic fall!

 

If your camper is trying to decide between fall sports leagues….

Read “Gotta Play Them All!” to learn what skills your camper is really building on during practice and how playing multiple sports does more than keep your son or daughter active.

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If your camper has started a new school or you notice he/she is trying a new style or friend group…

Read “How Camp Tells You Who You Are”; discover how kids grow into their own self-identity and what types of activities help foster that growth.

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If your camper hasn’t put down his/her cell phone since coming home…

Read “Smart Phones, Laptops, and iPhones- Oh My!” for some tips to help keep your campers grounded in reality and not in cyberspace.

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If you’re listening to camp stories and trying to keep track of who is who…

Put a face to a name with this post about our First Term staff and this post about our Second Term staff!

Getting Back To the Grind with Camp in Mind

Getting Back To the Grind with Camp in Mind

Getting into the swing of the school year can be hard. Waking up early and following a morning routine doesn’t always happen naturally!

If your camper (and you!) are already dragging after the first few days of school, here are some things your camper did this summer that can make back-to-school mornings a little easier:

  • Preparing as much as possible the night before. Laying out the next day’s clothes and helping your camper pack their backpack can cut out early morning guesswork when everyone is still in a sleepy haze.
  • Following a calendar of activities. During the summer, each cabin has a calendar of the activities for the term and each camper follows their own individual schedule. Having an easily accessible schedule helps kids feel more ownership over their days!

SUN

MON TUES WED THUR FRI

SAT

PM Pack: Goggles, swim suit, cap Swim Team Practice @ 4pm

PM Pack: LAX pinnie, stick, pads

Lacrosse Practice @ 5:30pm

PM Pack: Latin book

Latin Club meeting after school  

 

PM Pack: Spirit shirt

Football Game @ 7pm  
  • Tidying up in the morning. Cleaning doesn’t have to be a huge overhaul. Each morning at camp, campers straighten up their things and make their beds. Set a time where your camper knows it’s time to finish getting ready and time to start cleaning up. You’ll be amazed at the difference! If your camper needs a morning boost of energy, try playing music to get them moving. Need some musical inspiration? Click here for the songs of Lonehollow 2016!
  • Set a bedtime routine. Mornings are much easier after a goodnight’s sleep. At home, try and shut down screen time about an hour before bed. At camp, cabins will sometimes read a chapter of a book each night, take turns telling parts of a story back and forth, and play quiet card games as a way to wind down from a busy day.

 

Getting back to the grind can be hard, but it doesn’t have to be if your camper continues to use the skills he/she built during the summer. We’re geared up for the start of a new school year!

How Camp Tells You Who You Are

How Camp Tells You Who You Are

Discovering one’s self-identity is an important part of growing up. Through the challenges and triumphs that children face, they begin to learn who they are, what they love and what they stand for. Your camper will develop a lot of their self identity during his or her time at camp.

Children begin to learn who they are at a very early age. First, they learn that they are an individual, and not just a unit composed of mom, dad, and themselves. To reach this important step in development, children must have the freedom to make choices, like when they choose their own schedules at the start of camp. They must also begin to be responsible for themselves. Remembering to brush their teeth, picking out their own clothes and getting ready for bed on their own are all responsibilities that campers learn while away from their parents.

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As your child grows, they begin to develop their strengths, identify their weaknesses, and learn how those aspects of themselves fit into their social groups. Maybe they discover that they’re great at speaking in front of groups while running for Crew Maverick, but not so good at one on one discussions. Or that they can make a great camp craft, but can’t kick a soccer ball. They learn how these strengths and weaknesses fit into their social groups, and how to use this knowledge to achieve their goals.

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Once children reach adolescence, they begin to reevaluate all that they’ve learned about themselves. and this knowledge will follow them into adulthood. The perseverance that they used while practicing for Crew Canoe will help them pass their first college exam and they’ll use the team building they developed during the Adventure Race to succeed at their first job.

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Self Identity develops through different stages of a child’s life, but a huge part of it will develop while he or she is having a blast at camp!

Smart Phones, Laptops and iPhones–Oh My!

Smart Phones, Laptops and iPhones–Oh My!

The first thing campers notice when they drive over the mountain is the loss of a cell phone signal. This symbolizes the start of a tech-free term, where emphasis is placed on their ability to run fast, play hard, and have fun and not on the speed that they can type a 140 character tweet.

Besides the distractions that technology leads to, researchers have also linked serious mental health problems to young people who overuse their smart phones, iPads and other devices. In a culture fueled by the need to be on the cutting edge of technology, it’s hard to take a step back and embrace the things we really need, like friends and family. And if it’s hard for you, then it’s even more difficult for your campers! Here are some tips to help keep your campers grounded in reality and not in cyberspace when they come home.

Lead By Example

Monkey see, monkey do. If you’re constantly checking your email while out to dinner or tweeting during a weekend baseball game, the kids are going to notice. Take a step back when out with the family and be involved in the moment, and encourage your campers to do the same. You can always reply to that work email on Monday.

Have a “Tech Rest” Moment

Take one hour out of your family’s day to not use technology. Turn off the TV, put your phone on silent, and hide the iPad. Go outside, play a board game, or just have dinner without any distractions. Your campers be surprised at how free they feel when they’re not constantly checking for notifications.

Don’t Let Them Sleep with Their Phones

Studies show that the blue light our phones, computers, and other devices omit has negative effects on our melatonin production, which regulates our sleep patterns. These effects are particularly damaging to teenagers. If you don’t want drowsy kids in the morning, turn off all electronics at least thirty minutes before bedtime and keep the technology out of their bedrooms.

Technology can help improve our lives, but it can also control it. It’s important to remind your camper that they own the technology, and not the other way around.

Meet Our Second Term 2016 Staff!

Meet Our Second Term 2016 Staff!

We would like to introduce you to our wonderful camp staff. Our staff attend universities all across the country and even on different continents. Bunk lists are available on CampMinder under news items from July 11. Log in here.

Kelsey Morris

Kelsey Morris

Kelsey is from Ada, Oklahoma, and attends East Central University where she studies early childhood education.

Sam Solcher

Sam Solcher

Sam is from College Station and attends Texas A&M University where he studies architecture.

Armand Navarro

Armand Navarro

Armand is from Katy, Texas, and attends the University of Houston where he studies mechanical engineering technology.

Lath Gage

Lath Gage

Lath attends the University of Houston where he studies construction management.

Celene Morales

Celene Marie Morales

Celene attends the University of Houston where she studies communication sciences and disorders.

Cristina Arevalo

Cristina Arevalo

Cristina is from Denton, Texas, and attends the Univeristy of North Texas where she studies radio, television and film.

Jade Shuriah

Jade Shuriah

Jade is from London, England, and attends the University of Nottingham where she studies criminology and sociology.

Alex Refaeian

Alex Refaeian

Alex is from El Paso, Texas, and attends the University of Massachusetts where he studies psychology.

Jacob Barnett

Jacob Barnett

Jacob is from Paris, Texas, and attends Texas A7M Commerce where he studies sport and recreational management.

Alex Stenberg

Alex Stenberg

Alex attends Benedictine College where she studies theology and evangelization.

Nic Gonzales

Nic Gonzales

Nic is from Houston, Texas, and attends the University of Houston where he studies mechanical engineering.

Heather Andrews

Heather Andrews

Heather is from San Angelo, Texas, and attends Angelo State University where she studies coaching, sport recreation and fitness administration.

Quincy Barton

Quincy Barton

Quincy attends Texas A&M University where she studies agronomy.

Summer Wright

Summer Wright

Summer is from Denton, Texas, and attends North Central Texas College where she is studying for an associates of arts degree.

Rob Kinsel

Rob Kinsel

Rob is from Jourdanton, Texas, and attends Jourdanton High School.

Caroline Swanson

Caroline Swanson

Caroline is from San Antonio, Texas, and attends Alamo Heights High School.

Alex Skrocki

Alex Skrocki

Alex is from Honolulu, Hawaii, and attends Texas A&M University where she studies recreation, parks and tourism sciences.

Horst Evans

Horst Evans

Horst is from San Antonio, Texas, and attends Trinity University where he studies computer science.

Janelle Paul

JaNelle Paul

Janelle is from Phoenix, Arizona, and attends Grand Canyon University where she is studying elementary and special education.

Katelyn Grosvenor

Katelyn Grosvenor

Katelyn is from College Station and attends Texas A&M University where she studies human resources.

McKaley Badgett

McKaley Badgett

McKaley is from San Antonio and attends Texas A&M University where she studies wildlife and fisheries sciences.

Reid Schroder

Reid Schroder

Reid attends the University of Louisville where he studies finance.

Jenna Sabin

Jenna Sabin

Jenna is from San Clement, California, and attends Angelo State University where she is studying for her master’s in education, coaching, recreation and fitness.

Analise Gutierrez

Analise Gutierrez

Analise is from McAllen, Texas, and attends Texas A&M University where she studies biology.

Ben Murphy

Ben Murphy

Ben attends Wichita Collegiate Highschool.

Hallie Moore

Hallie Moore

Hallie is from New Orleans, Louisiana, and attends Tulane University where she studies business and political science.

Maddie Grimes

Maddie Grimes

Maddie is from San Antonio, Texas, and attends Trinity University where she studies psychology and education.

Helen Chavez

Helen Chavez

Helen attends Texas State University where she studies education.

Trip Phillips

Trip Phillips

Trip is from Fort Worth, Texas, and attends Trinity University where he studies biochemistry as a pre-med student.

Kara Edwards

Kara Edwards

Kara is from Bastrup, Texas, and attends Angelo State University where she studies coaching, sport, recreation and fitness administration.

Patrick Sullivan

Patrick Sullivan

Patrick is from Bellaire, Texas, and attends Baylor University where he studies biology.

Ben DeBauge

Ben DeBauge

Ben is from San Antonio, Texas, and attends Trinity University where he studies history and physics.

Anna Solcher

Ana Solcher

Anna is from College Station and attends Texas A&M University where she studies nutrition.

Jackson Taylor

Jackson Taylor

Jackson is from Houston and attends Rice University where he studies chemical engineering.

Jake Hammer

Jake Hammer

Jake attends the Kinkaid School.

Patch Pape

Patch Pape

Patch is from Austin, Texas, and attends Austin High School.

MK Donovan

MK Donovan

MK is from Friendswood, Texas, and attends Friendswood High School.

Giuliana Daleo

Guiliana Daleo

Giuliana is from Beaumont, Texas, and attends Monsignor Kelly Catholic High School.

Mattie Yoes

Mattie Yoes

Mattie is from Beaumont, Texas, and attends Monsignor Kelly Catholic High School.

Eric Johnson

Eric Johnson

Eric is from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and attends Louisiana State University where he studies electrical engineering.

Sophia Parella

Sophia Parella

Sophia is from Worcester, Massachusetts, and attends the University of Massachusetts where she studies psychology.

Morgan Ellis

Morgan Ellis

Morgan is from Tom Bean, Texas, and attends Texas A&M University where she studies recreation, parks and tourism sciences.

Jacob Delgado

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Jacob attends Angelo State University and is studying kinesiology.

Stephen Igbinosa

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Stephen is from Sherman, Texas, and attends Austin College where he studies international economics and finance.

Masyn Upchurch

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Masyn is from San Marcos and attends Texas State University where she studies therapeutic recreation.

Charlotte Affolter

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Charlotte is from Boise, Idaho, and attends Boise State University where she studies environmental studies.

Michael Adeyemo

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Michael is from San Angelo, Texas and attends Angelo State University where he studies coaching, sport, recreation and fitness administration.

Maddy Rock

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Maddy Rock attends the University of Texas at Austin where she studies business.

Sarah Egan

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Sarah is from Austin, TX.

Julia Gassiot

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Julia is from Denton and attends the University of North Texas where she studies psychology.

Haley LaMontagne

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Haley is from Spring, Texas, and attends Baylor University where she studies biology and Spanish.

Hailey Hutson

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Hailey is from Friendswood, TX, and will attend Texas Christian University where she studies speech pathology.

Ximena Alvarez

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Ximena attends the University of Texas at Austin where she studies theatre and dance.

Alyssa Tannous

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Alyssa attends the University of Houston where she studies education.

Christina Bryson

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Christina Bryson graduated from Allegheny College where she studied English and Journalism.

Olivia Lasater

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Olivia is from Georgetown, Texas and attends Southwestern University where she studies biology.

Matthew Burks

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Matthew attended the University of North Texas and has a degree in hospitality management.

Nikki Dwyer

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Nikki attends the University of North Texas where she is majoring in integrated studies.

Jordan Peoples

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Jordan is from Houston and is a fourth grade teacher.

Parker Brissette

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Parker is from College Station, TX and attends Texas A&M University where she studies human resource development.

Jake Hart

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Jake attends Leeds Beckett University where he studies sport and exercise science.

Paige Lauri

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Paige is from Nashville, Tennessee, and attends Belmont University where she studies social entrepreneurship.

Phoebe Brook

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Phoebe is from Coventry, England, and attends the University of Nottingham where she studies nursing.

Kristiana Llanos

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Kristiana is from New Orleans, LA and attends Loyola University New Orleans where she is studying for her master’s in mental health counseling.

Hannah Kearney

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Hannah is from Denton, Texas, and is an event coordinator with JP Morgan.

Collin Gillen

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Collin is from Baton Rouge, LA and is a mechanical engineer.

Addie Proctor

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Addie attends Texas A&M University where she studies agricultural leadership and communication.

Luke Stodghill

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Luke attends the University of Texas at Austin where he studies acting.

Mary Salotto

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Mary has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Dallas and a master’s from Widener University in clinical psychology.

Jaqui Pace

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Jaqui is from Willis, Texas, and attends the University of Houston where she studies music education and American Sign Language interpretation.

Bryson Overton

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Bryson is from San Angelo, TX and attends Angelo State University where he studies child and family studies.

Sarah Marris

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Sarah is from Newmarket in the United Kingdom.

Kelsey Largent

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Kelsey attends Texas A&M at Corpus Christi where she studies political science.

Rae Canton

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Rae attends the University of Colorado where she studies English.

Connor Alcock

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Connor is from Crewe in the United Kingdom.

Ben Contant

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Ben attends the University of Houston where he studies finance.

Ben Berry

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Ben attends the University of Central Missouri where he studies drafting and design.

Rose Powell

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Rose is from Hayward, CA, and attends California State University East Bay where she studies recreational management.

Andrea Allen

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Andrea is from Clarksville, TN, and attends Austin Peay State University where she studies mass communication with a specialization in internet technology.

Maria Andrade

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Maria attends the University of Texas at Austin where she studies public relations.

Ashley Richards

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Ashley attends Southampton Solent University where she studies psychology.

Toby Hussey

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Toby is from Southampton, England, and studies sport and physical education.

Brandon Ardoin

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Brandon attends Santa Fe University where he studies business management.

Job Cook

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Job is from London, England, and attends Hertfordshire University where he majors in sports studies.

Quentin Mathes

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Quentin is from Canyon, TX, and attends West Texas A&M University where he studies education and history.

Valerie Donohoe

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Valerie attends Texas A&M University where she studies education.

Darragh Mangan

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Darragh attends University College Cork in Ireland where he studies nutritional sciences.

Lauren Smajstrla

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Lauren is from Round Rock, TX and attends the University of Houston where she studies marketing and public relations.

Emilie Stagoski

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Emilie attends Missouri State University where she studies global studies.

Aline Ngo

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Aline is from Houston, TX and attends Baylor University where she studies nursing.

Thomas Callaghan

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Thomas is from Galway City, Ireland. He attends the National University of Ireland in Galway where he studies human rights and English.

Casey O’Gorman

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Casey is from London, England and attends Leeds Beckett University where he studies sports business management.

Emily Mullins

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Emily attends Texas State University where she studies education.

Tom Richards

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Tom attends the University of the West of England where he studies fine arts.

James Colbeck

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James is from Norwhich, England, where he is a P.E. teacher and soccer coach.

Sunny Campbell

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Sunny is from Houston, Texas.

Will Lawton

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Will attends the University of Leeds where he studies music.

Karson Karaff

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Karson attends Texas A&M University where he studies recreation, parks and tourism sciences.

Tom Day

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Tom attends the University of Essex where he studies veterinary physiotherapy.

Austin Long

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Austin is from Harper, TX and attends Angelo State university where he studies history.

Marcus Parkes

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Marcus attends Royal Holloway, University of London, where he studies economics.

Jay Arredondo

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Jay graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a degree in geography.

Rachel Williams

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Rachel attends the University of Tennessee where she studies accounting and human resources.

Halle Purdom

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Halle is from Friendswood, TX, and attends Brown University where she studies physics.

Bayleigh Cluett

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Bayleigh is from Vista, CA, and attends Grand Canyon University where she studies elementary and special education.

Jessie Atkins

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Jessie attends Texas A&M University where she studies recreation, park and tourism sciences.

Nathan Monger

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Nathan attends Texas A&M University where he studies marketing.

Ian Hons

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Ian is from Jourdanton, TX, and attends Texas Lutheran University where he studies information systems.

Anthony Didion

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Anthony is from La Porte, IN, and attends Belmont University where he studies management and marketing.

Lauren Wolff

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Lauren is from Wimberley, TX, and attends Central Texas College where she studies nursing.

Tristen Stephenson

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Tristen attends West Texas A&M University where he studies biology.

Jimmy Davies

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Jimmy attends Edinburgh University where he studies economics.

Keith Owen

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Keith attends Texas A&M University where he studies English.

Anthony Creed

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Anthony attends University College Cork in Ireland where he studies business information systems.

Emily Cook

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Emily is from Fayetteville, AR and attends the University of Arkansas where she studies marketing and journalism.

Stephen Buley

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Stephen is from San Antonio, TX and attends Baylor University where he studies music performance.

Clementine Berranger

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Clementine is from Houston, TX and attends the University of Houston where she studies education.

Mia Purdom

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Mia attends Brown University where she studies computer science.

Brandon Johnson

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Brandon is from Huntsville, TX, and attends Sam Houston University where he studies mass communications.

Rowan Cooper

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Rowan attends Texas A&M University where she studies Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences.

Katie Story

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Katie attends Texas A&M University where she studies animal science.

Darbi Dowell

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Darbi is from Port Lavaca, TX, and attends Sam Houston University where she studies wildlife recreational entrepreneurship.

Zach Taylor

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Zach is from Richardson, TX, and attends the University of North Texas where he studies media arts.

Amelia Mueller

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Amelia is from Keller, TX, and attends the University of North Texas where she is studying public relations.

Sara Sherman

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Sara is from Denton, TX and attends the University of North Texas where she studies journalism.

Brady Duncum

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Brady attends Texas Tech University where he is studying education.

Bo Porter

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Bo is from Abilene, TX, and attends McMurry University where he studies history.